Pressure Injuries and the Human Warranty

In this post I will discuss two recent articles that together make the case that pressure injuries might be a manifestation of a human biological warranty. The first is Unavoidable Pressure Injury: State of the Science and Consensus Outcomes, published in the Journal...

Prime Time Television, Disease, and Death

I recently experienced the phenomenon of cognitive dissonance during a commercial on the evening world news.  It was an advertisement promoting a diabetes medicine that showed people with diabetes at a barbecue, cooking and dancing.  How different this was from my day...

A Geriatrician Reviews Cicero’s “On Old Age”

As a geriatrician entering the twilight of my career, I look to the philosophers of my field for guidance on how to navigate my own later years. In addition to contemporary texts and journals I turned toward the ancients and discovered a gem in the writings of Cicero,...

Speaking of Art and Aging at MOMA

It was my pleasure and honor to speak today at the Museum of Modern Art in a lecture entitled “Picturing Aging: The View From a Geriatrician.”  The talk presented my portfolio of images of aging, and discussed the relationship between art and growing old.  It was...

The Geriatric Workforce and Quality of Care

What could be less intuitive than a shrinking medical specialty in the face of surging demand? A recent New York Times article discussed the growing shortage of geriatricians in America. Despite the fact that there are more older Americans than any time in history,...

The Old Man of Lake Titicaca

In 2010 the closing of St. Vincents Hospital in Manhattan gifted me with time to indulge my wanderlust, and so I went to Lake Titicaca in the Bolivian highlands of South America to celebrate the winter solstice with the shamans. On this trip I discovered a ceramic...