More Snow in Manhattan!

As the sixth storm of the season dumps more snow on the northeast, most of us are getting a little tired of looking at it. Two of the storms came as arctic blasts and introduced new verbiage in the form of the ‘polar vortex’ to our daily lives.  But life goes on in Manhattan as plunging temperatures, biting winds, and falling snow add an element of quiet poetry to the city streets.

This post presents some images from this long winter that reflect the poetry of Manhattan in snow. On a snowy morning in Washington Heights I found a lady braving the icy steps at 187th Street that connects Fort Washington Avenue to Overlook Terrace. Elsewhere a father escorts his young daughter to school while orthodox Jewish men head off to pray. In midtown, commuters hunker down when running to Penn Station while stylish women search out karaoke bars in Korea Town on 32nd Street.

In Madison Square Park the bronze statue of William Seward braves the storm while pedestrians pile in and out of subway entrances, and dozens of Citibikes sit idle. Further downtown in Chinatown a man pauses to light up a smoke, perhaps bringing a bit of warmth to his body. On the Upper East Side a family heads home with their Christmas tree, while delivery men on bicycles and scooters service homes and offices all over the city.

I took these shots while commuting back and forth from work, and on brief outings just to watch the snow fall. I tried to capture some moments in this long and difficult winter that sing the beauty of this great city and the people who live and work here.

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Related posts:

Manhattan After the Hurricane
Umbrella Symphony in Manhattan
Signs of Spring in Manhattan

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Dr. Jeffrey M. Levine has authored numerous articles on topics related to healthcare of the elderly. These include medical history, prevention and treatment of chronic wounds such as pressure ulcers, elder neglect and abuse, and physical restraints. He has also edited a book on legal and regulatory aspects of nursing homes.